Inks · Vintaj Natural Brass

Altering Vintaj Natural Brass™ Blanks with Alcohol Inks

Our first video!

31 thoughts on “Altering Vintaj Natural Brass™ Blanks with Alcohol Inks

  1. This was quite a good video for teaching how to alter Vintaj blanks. I like the step by step directions that were clear and easy to follow. I have been inspired to try this technique. Thanks.

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  2. I have been using Vintaj pieces in my jewelry since I took 3rd place in Metals in the Beadstar competition in 2008. And I have recently purchased several alcohol inks-but was not willing to dive in (I didn’t want to ‘ruin’ any of my Vintaj pieces)–until I saw this video. It has given me confidence & inspiration to start creating & playing, both with the inks, and with riveting. Thank you for posting this very easy video.

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  3. Awesome video! I’ve been very curious about the alcohol inks and now have a great application for them. Thanks so mu ch for sharing the video – very well done and easy to understand.

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  4. Great video! I haven’t seen any of the Vintaj line around here, but I noticed that you said something about the patina on them – is that why you needed white paint? Just curious! 🙂

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    1. Yes, the white paint makes the transparent alcohol inks ‘pop’. If you want a different tone you can use a different paint color. Lake Mist is a very pale green, and a good alternative to Snow Cap, or a color would have an interesting effect too. The Vintaj Natural Brass line is a patinaed product that goes through a 7 step process, with several of the steps being hand done. We offer the entire line on our site: Vintaj Natural Brass.

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  5. Great Video! Ordered some pieces and followed the video but they turned out so nice we couldn’t bring ourselves to sand them. Now we need to seal them…can you please tell what sealant you recommend? Next batch we’ll try the sanding.

    Thanks

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    1. We offer a sealer from Nunn Design that we recommend. You can use a paint brush to apply and the brush can be washed with water afterward, very easy to use. Just search for Sealant and it will come up

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  6. Wow, MORE things I needed from the scrapbook aisle for jewelry-making did not include a die-cutter/embosser. . .at least I THOUGHT that was low on my list dangit!

    Wonderful video! Thanks for sharing the technique.

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  7. I’ve been playing around with this for a couple of weeks before I saw your video. My basic problem is finding the right Cuttlebug embossing folders to put an attractive design on the disks. At the start of your video you show lots of colored disks with different designs on them. I recognize the clockworks embossing folder on one, but what are the other names?

    I also was doming the disks before inking; I think I’ll try your way because there would be a bit more control in how the color flowed and what gets sanded off. I also have been using Diamond Glaze as the final sealant. It makes them look like they’ve been enameled.

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    1. Yes, doming last is best. And I would recommend the Nunn Sealer we sell rather than Diamond Glaze as a finish because Diamond Glaze is not permanent. It will rehydrate in moist environments or if it gets wet, think rain, and it will yellow over time. The sealer will not yellow and is permanent. Thanks for the kind words.

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      1. Rehydrate in moist climates! I live in Portland, Oregon. Glad you mentioned it. I clicked on the link about the Nunn Sealer and it seemed that it was not the final sealant…..?

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  8. When using it with resin its not the final coast, the resin is, but for anything else that needs a final coast it seals fine and is an excellent top coat. Its an acrylic sealer so by nature it will keep liquids out.

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  9. Diamond Glaze is an excellent craft quality product, non toxic and great for working with kids, but its not permanent. Useful for putting a bit of dimension into a paper project, really what it was designed for.

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  10. I love the video instructions (!) and have been up most of two nights embossing and inking. I’m wondering why am I having some trouble with the ink bleeding when I put the sealer coat on? I waited 4 hours and am using Vintaj glaze only because I didn’t know about the Nunn until now. Can I sand again after sealing?

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    1. I haven’t had this problem, and alcohol inks do dry very fast so 4 hours is plenty long. Perhaps the Nunn Design sealer would work better in this case as the new Vintaj Glaze is more of a mixative and it might be rehydrating the inks. I will have to try it out with the inks and see. As for sanding, it would defeat the purpose to sand after you seal, but if you wanted to give your piece a matt look you could go over it with very fine grit steel wool to give it a matt look, kinda cool looking.

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  11. It always seems to be the cranberry ink that bleeds. I just received the Nunn sealer from you and will try it out. The reason for sanding is only to get the red ink off the raised area where it bled. Great idea about the steel wool. Thank you so much for the ideas and the reply.

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    1. You are welcome, and you might consider trying the new Viintaj patinas. They are one step, no paint needed and they blend do you can get some cool color interactions.

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    1. We do sell the Sizzix BigKick which I prefer due to the larger footprint which makes the machine more stable. Use the current discount code to get it at 20% off.( OCT20 good through Friday Oct 4th.) and we also offer the Vintaj Deco-Etch and Deco-Emboss folders with designs that are smaller and perfect on smaller pieces like the metal blanks. You can find the machine here: http://www.bellomodo.com/product_info.php?products_id=1000016963 and the folders here: http://www.bellomodo.com/index.php?cPath=1156_495 and you can find the blanks there too.

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